Daily Current Affairs (MCQ) | Date 16.11.21

Daily Current Affairs (MCQ) | Date 16.11.21

Daily Current Affairs (MCQ) | Date 16.11.21

Q1. In which of the following cases the Supreme Court ordered a minimum 2 years of tenure for CBI director ?

a. Vineet Narain vs Union of India (1997)
b. Shafin Jahan vs Asokan K.M.
c. Rupa Ashok Hurra vs Ashok Hurra & Anr
d. K.S. Puttaswamy (Retd) v. Union of India (2017)

Answer : a

Why is the Question ?

Exception to the rule
Allowing yearly extensions to heads of CBI, ED will compromise their autonomy

Vineet Narain vs Union of India (1997):
1. The new law authorising an extension of the services of the heads of the Central Bureau of Investigation and the Enforcement Directorate until they complete a total tenure of five years will seriously compromise the autonomy of those agencies.
2. It goes against the spirit of the Supreme Court judgment in Vineet Narain vs Union of India (1997) which laid down a dictum that the Directors of the CBI and the ED should have a minimum tenure of two years. This was to prevent their sudden transfer out of office if their functioning goes against the interests of the regime of the day.
3. While it did not specifically bar longer terms or extensions, the prospect of getting an annual extension can be an incentive for displaying regime loyalty in the discharge of their duties.

Q2. Which of the following states is implementing the SilverLine railway project across Western Ghats?

a. TamilNadu
b. Kerala
c. Karnataka
d. Telangana

Answer : b

Why is the Question ?

Is SilverLine on the right track?

1. The Kerala government is facing political heat over its ambitious 540-km-long semi high-speed railway project, SilverLine, which proposes to reduce the travel time between Thiruvananthapuram in the south to Kasaragod in the north.
2. The project also aspires to open up verdant hinterlands to development, decongest highways and reduce Kerala’s carbon footprint. The government has pegged SilverLine’s cost at ₹63,941 crores. K-Rail, a Central and State joint venture, will execute the project. Kerala holds a 51% share in K-rail and the Union Railways Ministry holds the rest.

Q3. Arrange the following sector in increasing order terms of their share in total methane emission in India

1. Agriculture
2. Waste
3.Energy

Select the correct answer from the codes given below

a. 1, 2, 3
b. 1, 3, 2
c. 3, 1, 2
d. 2, 1, 3

Answer : b

Why is the Question ?

ICMR moots change in cattle rearing practices, shift from coal

1.Senior scientists at the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) have recommended that India shift from “traditional animal husbandry practices” and “urgently wean away from coal as its main source of energy”.
2. This is to combat the challenges of climate change that is posing a global threat, causing premature mortality due to ambient air pollution.
3. The combustion of coal, mainly in power plants followed by industrial and household settings, has resulted in an increase in premature mortality.
4. Therefore, India needs to urgently wean away from coal as its main source of energy and needs to invest more in renewable, cleaner and sustainable sources such as solar, wind or
hydro energy.

Q4. Which of the following factors play a crucial role in exacerbating pollution in New Delhi?

1. Thermal Inversion
2. NorthWesterly Winds
3. Farm Fires

Select the correct answer from the codes given below

a. 1 and 2 only
b. 1 only
c. 2 and 3 only
d. 1, 2, and 3

Answer : d

Why is the Question ?

‘Urban factors, not farm fires, cause of pollution’ 

1. The Supreme Court the “cat is out of the bag” to prove that urban factors such as construction activities, industry, vehicular exhaust and road dust were actually the major causes of pollution in Delhi and not farmers’ stubble burning.
2. Chief Justice Ramana said the court had been insisting that stubble burning was not the major cause. “Pollution is caused by city-related issues... You first take care of them and then we will come to stubble burning”.
3. During the hearing, the court found that the Centre’s Commission for Air Quality Management in National Capital Region (NCR) and Adjoining Areas Act had not “precisely” chalked out a plan to immediately control pollution caused by construction, vehicles, power plants and industries.
4. In fact, the centre said, “drastic steps” like the odd-even vehicles’ scheme, ban on entry and plying of trucks in the capital and a complete lockdown had been “deferred” for now. “The severest step would be a lockdown.” 

5.Senior advocate Vikas Singh, for the petitioners, said the Centre had made a “wrong statement in court today on stubble burning as their highpowered meeting last night has recorded that stubble burning even now is responsible for 35- 40% of Delhi’s air pollution”.

Q5. Recently, Nigeria launched its central bank digital currency (CBDC) — the eNaira. Which of the following can be the advantages of digital currency?

1. Cheaper, faster, safer and more efficient domestic payments systems and cross-border remittances
2. Deepening financial inclusion
3. Avoid the damaging consequences of such private virtual currencies
4.Swift monetary policy transmission

Select the correct answer from the codes given below

a. 1 only
b. 1, 2 and 3 only
c. 2, 3 and 4 only
d. 1, 2, 3 and 4

Charting India’s path to a ‘Digital Rupee’

CBDC wave
1. In late October 2021, Nigeria launched its noninterest-yielding central bank digital currency (CBDC) — the eNaira. In doing so, it joined the Bahamas and five islands in the East Caribbean as the only economies to have introduced CBDCs.
2. In substance, the great hope for the eNaira lies in its perceived potential to address inefficiencies in Nigeria’s payment, remittances, and public welfare distribution systems, while progressing financial inclusion.
The Rationale for CBDC:
1. This desire to make domestic payments systems and cross-border remittances cheaper, faster, safer and more efficient, and deepen financial inclusion, represent key areas of priority for most other emerging market and development economies (EMDEs).
2. Central banks, faced with dwindling usage of paper currency, seek to popularize a more acceptable electronic form of currency (like Sweden);
3. Jurisdictions with significant physical cash usage seeking to make issuance more efficient (like Denmark, Germany, or Japan or even the US);
4. Central banks seek to meet the public’s need for digital currencies, manifested in the increasing use of private virtual currencies, and thereby avoid the more damaging consequences of such private currencies.
5. An economy that adopts an interest-bearing CBDC could make the interest rate on CBDCs the main tool of monetary policy transmission domestically (assuming a high degree of substitution of fiat and fiat-like currency).
6. In such a case, monetary policy transmission would no longer be constrained by the downward rigidity of interest rates and traditional limitations of zero-lower bound.